Tag Archives: Titles

Internship: Coffee House Press

Coffee House Press

Coffee House Press is looking for an intern for the spring 2020 semester. The internship will introduce you to  small literary publishing, and will give you skills to transfer to larger publishing houses and other careers, both in the arts and elsewhere. Applicants should be organized, reliable, efficient individuals interested in a publishing career.

The hours are flexible, averaging 12–15 hours per week over the course of approximately four months for a total of at least 200 hours. At the completion of the internship, interns receive a $1,200 stipend, $100 worth of discounted Coffee House titles, and a discount on all future purchases.

INTERN TASKS:

  • Reading and reporting on submissions
  • Manuscript fact-checking
  • Proofreading
  • Acquisitions and permissions research
  • Filing and other assorted administrative duties (such as answering phones and taking messages)
  • Researching donor and grant prospects
  • Database upkeep, including spreadsheets and database software
  • Writing copy for newsletters, reading group guides, and the CHP website
  • Coordinating and assisting with mailings (galleys, press releases, catalogs, etc.)
    Assisting with upkeep of publicity materials
  • Light page layout and editing of press materials, signs, and other documents
    Providing support before and during events
  • Assisting with direct sales in the office and at events
  • Website maintenance
  • Other tasks as assigned

This internship is located in Minneapolis, MN and will not be remote. Submissions are from September 15, 2019 from November 1, 2019 with the internship lasting January through April of 2019. To apply, send:

  • A cover letter explaining why you’re applying and your preferred start date.
  • A detailed resume with your work and academic background.
  • A list of five favorite contemporary books in any genre.
  • Optional: up to three pages of additional documents (e.g., references, work samples).
  • I-9 employment eligibility verification is required.
  • Email the required application materials to the Intern Coordinators at internship@coffeehousepress.org.

If aren’t able to email and need to send your application snail mail, you can call (612) 338-0125. They will not accept internship applications in person. Please do not call the line to pitch your materials! And as always, good luck.

P.D. Pabst
Blogger and writer of MG/YA fiction

Remote Internship: Don Congdon Associates

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This remote internship opportunity will be to work with an agent at Don Congdon Associates. The intern is to be detail-oriented and well-read in contemporary titles. Responsibilities include evaluating client and potential client manuscripts and query letters in genres and ages ranging from literary fiction, narrative non-fiction, middle grade, and young adult. Classes and independent projects will be assigned based on ability and interest (including publishing contracts, author marketing, and client/editor research).

The intern will be expected to work remote at least two full days per week September through December. The agency wants someone who has confidence in their reading ability, will take initiative, and can represent the agency professionally. The application deadline is July 26, 2019.

Submit a cover letter and resume in the body of an email to Katie Grimm at kgrimm@doncongdon.com with FALL INTERNSHIP in the subject line. In the cover letter, offer examples of recent titles you’ve read, your favorite authors, and/or anything which will help them get a sense of your reading interests and taste. (No email attachments.)

As always, good luck!

P.D. Pabst
Blogger and writer of MG/YA fiction.

Monthly Mumbles: Book Covers (or Lacking)

MEH.

Please note, these are solely my thoughts and nothing more. But, I had to share, regardless of how shallow my readers might think me to be. Recently I got asked to select a free book from a publisher to read. It was my choice, so I could’ve selected anything. I was slightly familiar with the publisher, since I know someone that edits for them. Thus, I was thrilled to take my freebie! (Besides…booooooks people!)

Now, we’ve all heard the phrase “don’t judge a book by its cover”. And sure, this holds true for many things, especially humans. But in marketing, what’s in front of a consumer must be visually stimulating. And I confess, I am a consumer that needs roused to pick up a book before I’ve ever read the blurb. But from a marketing standpoint, this is just smart business!

So, imagine my dismay as I perused unpleasant cover art from various titles to select my awarded freebie. Most looked cheaply done or simply didn’t mesh with the title. And forgive me for this, but I judge the lack of detail given to a book’s cover as indication of the lack of editing probably given to the story. My eyes will roam over the cover and move along to the next. And with technology today, there simply isn’t a good reason to have bad cover art!

As authors, we don’t always have control over the cover art, but I’d stress to stand ground when something seems extremely off or comes across cheap in appearance. Should a writer want a lovely embracing couple on their horror book? No, this would lead readers to think it’s a love story and could result in bad reviews from romance readers. And authors wouldn’t want a picture of an ocean if their entire story is set within a magical forest. Why would authors expect anything less than perfect for their book baby? This is even more important for authors self publishing. Take the same amount of time on the cover art as you spend on editing. If you hire out the art, be sure to check previous work before settling on the artist or company. This is about proper marketing. Give the reader a reason to pick up the book BEFORE they’ve read the blurb!

That’s it. Rant over.

P.D. Pabst
Blogger and writer of MG/YA fiction.