Tag Archives: Proofreading

Internship: Coffee House Press

Coffee House Press

Coffee House Press is looking for an intern for the spring 2020 semester. The internship will introduce you to  small literary publishing, and will give you skills to transfer to larger publishing houses and other careers, both in the arts and elsewhere. Applicants should be organized, reliable, efficient individuals interested in a publishing career.

The hours are flexible, averaging 12–15 hours per week over the course of approximately four months for a total of at least 200 hours. At the completion of the internship, interns receive a $1,200 stipend, $100 worth of discounted Coffee House titles, and a discount on all future purchases.

INTERN TASKS:

  • Reading and reporting on submissions
  • Manuscript fact-checking
  • Proofreading
  • Acquisitions and permissions research
  • Filing and other assorted administrative duties (such as answering phones and taking messages)
  • Researching donor and grant prospects
  • Database upkeep, including spreadsheets and database software
  • Writing copy for newsletters, reading group guides, and the CHP website
  • Coordinating and assisting with mailings (galleys, press releases, catalogs, etc.)
    Assisting with upkeep of publicity materials
  • Light page layout and editing of press materials, signs, and other documents
    Providing support before and during events
  • Assisting with direct sales in the office and at events
  • Website maintenance
  • Other tasks as assigned

This internship is located in Minneapolis, MN and will not be remote. Submissions are from September 15, 2019 from November 1, 2019 with the internship lasting January through April of 2019. To apply, send:

  • A cover letter explaining why you’re applying and your preferred start date.
  • A detailed resume with your work and academic background.
  • A list of five favorite contemporary books in any genre.
  • Optional: up to three pages of additional documents (e.g., references, work samples).
  • I-9 employment eligibility verification is required.
  • Email the required application materials to the Intern Coordinators at internship@coffeehousepress.org.

If aren’t able to email and need to send your application snail mail, you can call (612) 338-0125. They will not accept internship applications in person. Please do not call the line to pitch your materials! And as always, good luck.

P.D. Pabst
Blogger and writer of MG/YA fiction

Need A Sensitivity Reader?

book-spines

Writing In The Margins has helped writers create appealing words to readers for awhile. What I didn’t know, they also have dedicated time to help writers find sensitivity readers. With publishers understanding the need for diverse voices in today’s world, there’s been a push for these types of manuscripts. For those unfamiliar, the diversity push means publishers are looking for stories told by the minority voices.

But, what if you’re a male or female heterosexual Caucasian in perfect health who has a great story idea for a Muslim main character, or a fabulous manuscript for a lead character with autism? Does this mean you shouldn’t write it? Of course you should. However, what this really means is you’re possibly not the best person to write the story. But wait, I just told you to write the story. Of course, you can absorb yourself into research. After all, you can find nearly everything on the internet these days, and writer’s have done so with secondary characters. But, there is something else they do, which I recently learned about during WriteOnCon.

If you want to write a story with a diverse leading character and you’re obviously not what our culture considers to be a minority, then getting a sensitivity reader might be what you need when writing outside of your own culture and experience. Writing In The Margins has a list of sensitivity readers of Muslim, Judaism, Autism, African-American, Japanese, LGBT, Deafness, Latina, Transgender, and more!

This is how the site defines the sensitivity reader: A sensitivity reader reads through a manuscript for issues of representation and for instances of bias on the page.  The goal of a sensitivity reader isn’t to edit a manuscript clarity and logic, although that may be an additional service offered. A sensitivity reader reviews a manuscript for internalized bias and negatively charged language.  A sensitivity reader is there to help make sure you do not make a mistake, but they are also NOT a guarantee against making a mistake.

If you want to write a story with leading diverse characters and aren’t a minority, use someone from the site’s list to polish your script. As always, good luck!

P.D. Pabst
Blogger and writer of MG/YA fiction.