Tag Archives: NY Times Best Seller

2017 Savannah Book Festival

Celebrating its tenth year, the Savannah Book Festival is proud to announce the full roster of bestselling and emerging authors presenting at this year’s Festival, slated for Feb. 16-19, 2017 in and around Savannah’s historic Telfair, Wright, and Chippewa Squares.

Authors James Patterson, Colson Whitehead, and Christina Baker Kline will headline the 2017 celebration of the written word. But there another 40 authors attending this event. Don’t miss out on this learning experience and ventures around Savannah!

Have fun and learn lots!

P.D. Pabst
Blogger and writer of MG/YA fiction.

Review (sort of): Suffer the Children by John Saul

Confession: I had never read a John Saul novel until a co-worker named Kendall offered to swap books. He gave me SUFFER THE CHILDREN, which apparently was John’s debut novel as his writerly-self. (He had published approximately ten other books under a pen name of S. Steinberg prior to the 1977 debut.)

Suffer the ChildrenAfter reading the prologue, I almost stopped reading the story completely. It was hard to swallow reading about a young girl being molested and murdered by her father. I seriously wondered what the hell Kendall had given me! I like creepy stuff (ghosts, vampires, weird creatures, and whatnot)but not morbid things like this. Yet, I pushed myself to read. Kendall had listened to me rant about the things I like and the things I write, so I should trust his judgment. Right?

So as I kept reading and learned indeed there was a ghost, and boy was that ghost evil! But I had hope for those that came in contact with the creepy ghoul that possessed another child, but the end of the novel was shattering. (I won’t spoil.) The end was a bit gruesome and I’m more of a suggestive kind of gal than detailed with killings in my writings. And that’s how I prefer to read too.

Now, as a writer, I often hear my peers and beta’s say to stay in the main character’s voice. And this story…oh my gosh! After I had counted ELEVEN point of view’s from different characters, I stopped counting. It made my head hurt. Seriously! But was the story told well? Yes, yes it still was. I kept turning the page to find out what happened next. I had a clear sense of place, as though I was along side the characters. I wanted to shout out and say, “No, don’t listen to her!” John Saul pulled me into his story regardless of my frustrations, and I suppose this is why he is a New York Times Best Seller.

I look forward to reading a more recent John Saul novel to see if his style is the same. And thanks Kendall for sharing your read with me!

P.D. Pabst
Writer and blogger of MG/YA fiction